Games
[Event "Teesside Congress"] [Site "?"] [Date "1984.07.15"] [Round "4"] [White "Bielby, P.R."] [Black "Stephenson, F.N."] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C34"] [Annotator "F.N.Stephenson {MJD}"] [PlyCount "65"] [EventDate "1984.07.15"] [EventType "swiss"] [EventRounds "5"] {[%evp 0,65,19,38,25,3,-5,-5,9,17,11,11,-4,-16,-30,-15,18,15,16,-3,5,-5,-24,-2, 40,38,27,47,28,25,26,20,23,13,3,-12,61,10,10,10,75,60,149,62,66,49,32,16,16,8, 0,-36,-45,-49,-55,-46,-41,-89,-88,-81,-88,-92,-90,-93,-91,-99,-106,-106]} 1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 d6 {(The key move of the Fischer Defence preventing the possibility of Ne5.)} 4. Bc4 h6 5. h4 {(An effort to inhibit Black from securing the f4 pawn with g5 which is not as common a move as )} (5. d4 g5 6. h4 (6. O-O {(The Hanstein Gambit which Thomas Johansson states is good for Black. A game that utilised this line and which has been analysed in detail for this web site (Month June-July 2014) went} Bg7 7. c3 Nf6 8. Qb3 O-O 9. e5 d5 10. Bd3 Ne4 11. Nbd2 Nxd2 12. Bxd2 c5 13. Bb1 f5 14. exf6 Bxf6 15. Qc2 Qc7 16. Qg6+ Qg7 17. dxc5 Na6 18. Qh5 Nxc5 19. h4 Ne4 20. Bxf4 Bxc3 21. bxc3 Rxf4 22. hxg5 Nxg5 23. Nxg5 Rxf1+ 24. Kxf1 hxg5 25. Bg6 Be6 26. Kg1 Rf8 27. Re1 Rf6 {and Black is a safe pawn up hence 0-1 in 40 moves F. Moon-F.N.Stephenson "Cleveland Open" 2003. An event where Norman turned up as a spectator and ended up playing!)}) 6... Bg7 7. Nc3 Nc6 {the weakness of the d4 pawn is a factor in these Bc4 lines} 8. Ne2 Qf6 (8... g4 $5) 9. c3 Nge7 10. g3 Bg4 ({ Stronger is} 10... g4 {and if} 11. Nh2 {then} f3 {is close to winning.}) 11. Qd3 ({If} 11. Rf1 Qg6 {was the plan}) 11... fxg3 12. Nxg3 $2 {Alan has lost the thread} (12. Rf1 {is forced but Black obtains a very good game after} g2 13. Rf2 Qg6 14. hxg5 hxg5 15. Rxg2 f5) 12... Bxf3 13. Rf1 g4 14. Bf4 Qxf4 15. Nh5 Qxe4+ 16. Qxe4 Bxe4 17. Nxg7+ Kd7 18. Rxf7 d5 19. Bb5 Rh7 20. c4 Rg8 { and Black is much material up hence 0:1 in 33 moves A.Trotter-F.N.Stephenson, Middlesbrough Championship 1984.}) ({( A completely different treatment recommended by Thomas Johansson in his fine book "The King's Gambit for the Creative Aggressor" is} 5. b3 $5 {after which two examples of play are} Nc6 ({ and} 5... Nf6 6. Nc3 Nc6 7. d4 g5 8. O-O Bg7 9. Bb2 g4 10. Ne1 Nh5 11. Nd5 Be6 12. Nxf4 Bxc4 13. bxc4 Nxf4 14. Rxf4 h5 15. Rb1 Qg5 16. g3 h4 17. Qxg4 Qxg4 18. Rxg4 Bxd4+ 19. Bxd4 Nxd4 20. Rxh4 Rxh4 21. gxh4 O-O-O {and Black, due to White's ruined pawn structure and despite being a pawn down, won a very fine R+P ending in 60 moves in M.J.Donnelly-M.Berry, Reyner Shield Bd1, Manchester 1982 (a position from a possible variation was the basis of an endgame study published in Vic Knox's column in the Manchester Evening News 11th Dec. 1982.)} ) 6. Bb2 Nf6 7. Nc3 g5 8. Qe2 Bg7 9. O-O-O O-O 10. g3 g4 11. Nh4 Nh5 12. Rdf1 Ne5 13. Qe1 Nxc4 14. bxc4 b5 15. cxb5 a6 16. bxa6 Rxa6 17. gxf4 c6 18. Rhg1 Qb6 {M.J.Donnelly-M.Shutze, European Corr. Ch sf 2000 and Black's attack proved decisive (0:1 in 32 moves). Both games clearly show how resiliant the Fischer Defence can be in thwarting White's efforts.)}) ({(} 5. d3 $5 {is an alternative idea of GM Gallagher, which he has played several times, that also keeps the game highly dynamic. The move has also been tested in some high level correspondence games)}) 5... Be7 6. d4 Nf6 ({(Another option is} 6... Bg4 {when White gets rapid development and open lines for pieces after, for example,} 7. Bxf4 Bxh4+ 8. g3 Be7 9. Qd3 {Blum-McDonnell, corr 1978 and repeated later by the strong players Koenig-Preussner, Remote-ch Class2 e-mail 2014.)}) 7. Nc3 O-O 8. Bxf4 Nxe4 {A tactic that secures Black a very comfortable game.} 9. Nxe4 ({(Sometimes White can reply to this tactic with} 9. Bxf7+ {and obtain an even game, but here it fails to} Rxf7 10. Nxe4 Rxf4 $19 {) }) 9... d5 10. Bxd5 ({(} 10. Nfg5 {is spectacular but loses to} dxc4 { Ferraroni-Caprifichi, ITA corr 1989.} ({but not} 10... hxg5 11. hxg5 {with a winning attack.)})) 10... Qxd5 11. Nc3 Bb4 ({(} 11... Qa5 12. Qd2 Bb4 13. O-O { is level as in the later game Meier-Schell, Regionalliga NW Bayern 1997.)}) 12. O-O Bxc3 13. bxc3 {Now Black's pawn structure is sounder and White has a looser position.} Bg4 {Envisaging an interesting pawn offer.} ({(Black may also attack the centre immediately with} 13... c5 {when a thematic opening game went} 14. Qe1 Nc6 15. Qg3 Ne7 16. Rfe1 Nf5 17. Qf2 {and White was in reasonable shape in Gentinetta-Zaniratti, SEMI KG Fischer Defence (2) e-mail 2000.)}) 14. Qd3 Bf5 15. Qe2 Nc6 16. Bxc7 {Accepting this pawn gives Black lots of pressure.} Rac8 17. Bf4 Bg4 18. Qe1 Rfe8 19. Qg3 Qh5 20. Rab1 Re2 21. Rf2 ({( If} 21. Rxb7 {then Black may recover material with} Be6 {)}) 21... Rxf2 22. Kxf2 Ne7 23. Ne5 Be6 24. Rxb7 Nf5 25. Qg4 Qxg4 26. Nxg4 Rxc3 27. Rb2 Nxd4 28. Be5 $6 ({(} 28. Ne3 {Offered some hope although Black remains better after} Ra3 {)}) 28... Rxc2+ 29. Rxc2 Nxc2 30. Ne3 Nxe3 31. Kxe3 Bxa2 32. Kd4 a5 33. g3 {Black is clearly winning (he can force widely-separated passed pawns) but, owing to time pressure, I agreed to a draw here. I won the last-round and shared 1st place on 4/5 with Paul Bielby, Dave Mooney & Colin Crouch (who had scrambled a draw against me in Round Two).} 1/2-1/2